singingThere are so many poorly told stories out there these days, so many more than even a few years ago. It only makes me even more grateful for really good writing when I find it — when anybody finds it — and here is an author you really simply shouldn’t miss: Sunny Moraine.

Moraine is thirty-ish, living in DC, and she writes wonderfully, long and short. She’s got two trilogies — one done, one just about — and she publishes short fiction regularly all around the web. Most recently, a book of her stories, SINGING WITH ALL MY SKIN AND BONE, has been published. Here’s the opening to its first story, “Come My Love and I’ll Tell You A Tale:”:

Tell me the story about the light and how it used to fall through the rain in rainbows.

Tell me the story about those times when the rain would come and the world would turn sweet and green and thick with the smell of wet dirt and things gently rotting, when the birds would chuckle with pleasure to themselves at the thought of a wriggling feast fleeing the deeper floods.

Tell me that story about how once we all had everything we wanted and never lost anything, about how once we slept and dreamed and sometimes we even slept without dreaming, total sleep that wrapped around our minds like a blanket and lulled and coaxed and woke just as softly, turning and sliding an arm around the waist of whoever happened to be beside you.

Tell me the story about lazy Sundays, about dinner at eight, about dressing like dolls and music that wound around us and kept out the world.

Tell me the story about how once there was cold, and snow, and all sound muffled and the world still, and a single one of those laughing birds sang tentative songs that suggested a long journey, a warmer climate, a finite amount of deprivation that only made the blooming of the world sweeter and more welcome.

Tell me about the times before the fires.

****

Come ON. How could you NOT want more?

The kindle for the short story collection is only $4.99. You can get it here:http://amzn.to/2d8gSjc It’s worth ten times that. And I’ll leave you the pleasure of discovering the rest of Moraines work on your own.

You’re welcome.